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The Three Biggest Mistakes Musicians & Songwriters Make With Songwriting

Updated: Sep 11


Do you know the 3 biggest mistakes musicians and songwriters make with songwriting that kill their results?


If you want to create an audience of raving fans and avoid the songwriting mistakes that stop most people dead in their tracks, read this immediately because the mistakes (and what to do instead) are inside this article.


Mistake #1: Thinking simply "releasing" their music is enough to get a following


One of the most common mistakes musicians and songwriters make is just tossing their music out into the world like wet noodles on the wall and hoping they stick somewhere.


It isn’t effective, you can’t be sure what you did to make something stick, and it's a complete mess.


Often musicians seem to think that the music is so good that it will sell itself. But as good as it may be to you, it isn’t on the same level as air or water; no one alive is convinced that they need it.


Just telling people “Hey I just released my song, please check it out and let me know what you think” is not a sales strategy. It isn’t even much of a feedback strategy, because timidly asking for something for you doesn’t give any incentive for them.


There is a wide gap between “Stupid gimmicks to get attention” and “Not trying”, and maybe it will surprise you that those are not the only two options.


Come up with a few different bands that mean the most to you. Try to write down a list of reasons why they are so important to you, and dig a few levels down to get real personal (beyond “That song is good”). There will be reasons that some music resonates with you, and they won’t all be strictly related to the music.


Find ways to relate and make a connection with people to make it easier for them to decide that they do want what you have to offer. Your music is a product, sure, but the real product is you as the artist. If you can give them enough reasons to want to connect with you and get to know who you are, people can start to see that you are someone they want to be around (even if it's your content while they walk their dog).


*If You Want To Write Amazing Music, But You're Worried About Being Just Another

Unheard Musician, Grab This FREE Chord Progression Ebook




Mistake #2: Not having a clear idea of who they are speaking to


When someone asks who your target audience is with your music, your answer should never be “everyone”. Wouldn’t that be nice if literally everyone on the planet wanted your music? Yes, yes it would. But that will never, ever happen.


When you dilute something, it’s less powerful. And you have seen this in action many times, when a band starts to get popular, they sign a big record deal, then the suits manipulate everything from their sound to their image to appeal to “the wider market”, and no one really likes it.


Don’t try to win over everyone, because you will be so lukewarm that you will win over no one.


You need to figure out the exact person you want to be directing your energy towards. Who are you speaking to? Who are you fighting for? What are you fighting against? How would that affect the person in your perfect audience? What are their likes and hobbies? What is their favourite book?


The more you know about your perfect listener, the more you can dial in how to speak to them. A message crafted for that person will attract that person to you.


And don’t forget, you are a musician; you can say something without having to use any words at all.


*If You Want To Write Amazing Music, But You're Worried About Being Just Another

Unheard Musician, Grab This FREE Chord Progression Ebook



Mistake #3: Choosing a genre first


Deciding that you want to be a creator of music is a big step to take, but too often it is immediately waylaid by making this mistake first.


Before any single note has been played, or the pen hits the paper, you declare for all the world to know that you are a _______ musician/artist/band.


You have now stuck yourself in a box. It’s bad enough to be labeled, but what is worse is when you label yourself with a trap like that.


This isn’t about having no genre at all, but if you don’t have an idea about your mission or message or target audience or what you stand for, you could be stifling your creativity before you are even out of the gate.


Let your mission dictate your message, which will dictate the music.


Do you want to write the exact same type of song a hundred times, get bored, try to do something different but get called a sellout because you are only supposed to be one thing?


Do you want your music to fall flat because a large portion of the musical creative process isn’t allowed to happen because of the constraints of following genre norms and cliches?


When you write music with intention first, you have room to breathe and let the song become what is best for the song.


You are an artist; you have many skills and colours to choose from.


*If You Want To Write Amazing Music, But You're Worried About Being Just Another

Unheard Musician, Grab This FREE Chord Progression Ebook



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